Upcoming CEN events...

Continuing conversations about the Social Model of Disability

Date:               Thursday 23rd June 2022

Time:              09:30 - 17:00 (GMT)

Venue:            live-streamed via Zoom

Speaker:         Steph Burgess - Senior Specialist Speech and                            Language Therapist - Airedale NHS Trust

                        Catherine Woolley - Programme Lead for                                      Children and Families at STAMMA

                        Sara MacIntyre - CCC-SLP and Director of                                  Programs for the Stuttering Foundation

Cost:               Included in the 12mth CEN membership                                      subscription

Timetable of the day:

 9.00 – 9.20 Registration

 

 9.20 – 9.30 Welcome and notices

 

 9.30 – 10.30 Steph Burgess

10.30 – 11.00 Break out discussion with questions

 

11.00 – 11.15 Tea/ Coffee break

 

11.15 – 12.15 Catherine Woolley STAMMA

12.15 – 12.45 Break out discussion with questions

 

12.45 – 13.30 Lunch (45 minutes)

 

13.30 – 14.30 Sara MacIntyre

14.30 – 15.00 Discussion and Q&A supporting the reflection and integration into clinical practice

 

15.00 – 15.15 Tea/ Coffee break

 

15.15 – 16.15 Hope Gerlach-Houck

16.15 – 16.45 Break out discussion with questions

 

16.45 – 17.00 Evaluation and close

 

Overview of the presentation

Steph Burgess - Working within the social model – reflections of an NHS stammering therapist

 

Catherine Woolley (STAMMA) - #nodiversitywithoutdysfluency – What are the negative assumptions people typically make about stammering and how can SLTs challenge these to support people that we work with? According to the social model of disability, negative cultural attitudes can lead to discrimination and exclusion as well as continued prejudice. Negative assumptions about stammering have been perpetuated by stereotypical and cliched portrayals across media such as television and film. By supporting people to have open conversations about stammering using accurate representations in modern media, SLTs can help to challenge negative assumptions and show people that it’s just the way that some people talk.

 

Sara MacIntyre - Unpacking Stuttering Acceptance: Understanding the Complexities from a Clinical and Personal Perspective

Acceptance is a layered, shifting, and evolving journey as it applies to stuttering and beyond. Individuals who stutter and clinicians alike can mistake the journey as having a finite destination, a place of absoluteness. However, this viewpoint can be limiting and misleading—leaving individuals to feel additional layers of shame and guilt, all while perpetuating the pervasive ‘I’m not good enough’ narrative. Similarly, clinicians can inadvertently oversimplify this process and ‘state of being’ leading to challenges and limitations within the therapeutic process and alliance. An additional complexity that can arise when discussing or exploring acceptance is this notion that acceptance and physical change, or communication change, cannot coexist—leaving clinicians feeling uncertain about what is ‘on the table’—potentially swinging the pendulum too far the other direction and not supporting any shifts towards more effective communication change.

In this talk, we will unpack acceptance as a concept, how it can be best applied to stuttering, and we will explore the nuances from both an individual and clinician perspective. We will explore different clinical experiences and overall philosophical frameworks that may contribute to helping to support a client’s journey towards greater stuttering acceptance, while also supporting their hopes for change within their overall communication including decreasing fears and avoidances. Interwoven throughout will be an emphasis on the importance of semantics, intentionality, and action-based change.

 

Hope Gerlach-Houck - Beyond the Medical Model: Why people hide stuttering and suggestions for supportive speech therapy with people who stutter covertly.

Historically, much of our understanding of covert stuttering has been born from conceptions of stuttering rooted in the medical model of disability. In this presentation, we will discuss how stigma and environmental factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of stuttering concealment. Participants will gain knowledge about why, how, and when people conceal stuttering. We will also explore affirming ways to support people who conceal stuttering through speech therapy focused on personal empowerment and environmental modification.

Working with Functional Neurological Symptoms and an update on a Covid Project.

Date:               Tuesday 22nd February 2022

Time:              09:30 - 15:30 (GMT)

Venue:            live-streamed via Zoom

Speaker:         Debbie Mason, Specialist SLT and

     Dr. Jennifer Chesters, SLT

Cost:               Included in the 12mth CEN membership subscription

 

Overview of the presentation

Debbie Mason is a specialist Stammering SLT and is currently Clinical Lead for the regional NHS Adult Stammering Service at North Bristol Trust. Until 2020 she was joint Clinical Lead for the Paediatric Stammering Service in Bristol and South Gloucestershire. Debbie is also a Hypnotherapist and Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) Master Practitioner with trainings in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Mindfulness. She weaves these approaches through her work with clients with Functional Neurological Symptoms (FNS) to help them uncover the resources they need to be well.

 

Debbie is currently doing a project on Best Care Pathways for SLT Clients with Functional Neurological Symptoms at North Bristol Trust. North Bristol Trust is home to the Rosa Burden Centre, a specialist regional centre for the assessment and treatment of people with FNS and has inpatient and outpatient programmes.

Debbie is particularly interested in the “Positive Intention” behind symptoms and has used this principle to help clients resolve symptoms.

 

This study day will aim to explore:

  • Terminology – Functional / Psychogenic. Are we clear what we mean?

  • Current Evidence Base – What do we know?

  • Assessment and Diagnosis

  • Therapy – What Works?

  • Resources

  • Client stories. Debbie can share stories of clients with successful outcomes. Please bring stories of any clients with successful outcomes that you would like to share.

  • We will have break-out rooms so that SLTs can discuss their own thoughts and experiences.

 

We will also be hearing from Dr. Jennifer Chesters on her findings from a Covid Project. Jennifer is a Senior Research Associate in the BSLTRU, and a Speech and Language Therapist and Neuroscientist by background. She completed a Psychology degree at the University of St. Andrews, where she developed an interest in the neural basis of communication. She went on to qualify as an SLT in 2008, through the Speech and Language Sciences MSc course at UCL. She has worked as a Speech and Language Therapist in Learning Disability, Forensic Mental Health and Dysfluency services.

 

The day will run from 09:30 - 15:30 online through ZOOM and will include tea/coffee breaks and a lunch break. The day will be recorded and the video will be available for CEN members to watch on the website for 3 months afterwards.

If you are already a member of the CEN, you can click on the button below to register for a place on this study day.

If you are not a member of the CEN, you can click on the button below to become a member.

Continuing conversations about the Social Model of Disability

Date:               Tuesday 22nd February 2022

Time:              09:30 - 15:30 (GMT)

Venue:            live-streamed via Zoom

Speaker:         Debbie Mason, Specialist SLT and Dr. Jennifer Chesters, SLT

Cost:               Included in the 12mth CEN membership subscription

 

Overview of the presentation

Debbie Mason is a specialist Stammering SLT and is currently Clinical Lead for the regional NHS Adult Stammering Service at North Bristol Trust. Until 2020 she was joint Clinical Lead for the Paediatric Stammering Service in Bristol and South Gloucestershire. Debbie is also a Hypnotherapist and Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) Master Practitioner with trainings in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Mindfulness. She weaves these approaches through her work with clients with Functional Neurological Symptoms (FNS) to help them uncover the resources they need to be well.

 

Debbie is currently doing a project on Best Care Pathways for SLT Clients with Functional Neurological Symptoms at North Bristol Trust. North Bristol Trust is home to the Rosa Burden Centre, a specialist regional centre for the assessment and treatment of people with FNS and has inpatient and outpatient programmes.

Debbie is particularly interested in the “Positive Intention” behind symptoms and has used this principle to help clients resolve symptoms.

 

This study day will aim to explore:

  • Terminology – Functional / Psychogenic. Are we clear what we mean?

  • Current Evidence Base – What do we know?

  • Assessment and Diagnosis

  • Therapy – What Works?

  • Resources

  • Client stories. Debbie can share stories of clients with successful outcomes. Please bring stories of any clients with successful outcomes that you would like to share.

  • We will have break-out rooms so that SLTs can discuss their own thoughts and experiences.

 

We will also be hearing from Dr. Jennifer Chesters on her findings from a Covid Project. Jennifer is a Senior Research Associate in the BSLTRU, and a Speech and Language Therapist and Neuroscientist by background. She completed a Psychology degree at the University of St. Andrews, where she developed an interest in the neural basis of communication. She went on to qualify as an SLT in 2008, through the Speech and Language Sciences MSc course at UCL. She has worked as a Speech and Language Therapist in Learning Disability, Forensic Mental Health and Dysfluency services.

 

The day will run from 09:30 - 15:30 online through ZOOM and will include tea/coffee breaks and a lunch break. The day will be recorded and the video will be available for CEN members to watch on the website for 3 months afterwards.

If you are already a member of the CEN, you can click on the button below to register for a place on this study day.

If you are not a member of the CEN, you can click on the button below to become a member.

Date:               Thursday 23rd June 2022

Time:              09:30 - 17:00 (GMT)

Venue:            live-streamed via Zoom

Speaker:         Steph Burgess - Senior Specialist Speech and                            Language Therapist - Airedale NHS Trust

                        Catherine Woolley - Programme Lead for                                      Children and Families at STAMMA

                        Sara MacIntyre - CCC-SLP and Director of                                  Programs for the Stuttering Foundation

Cost:               Included in the 12mth CEN membership                                      subscription

Timetable of the day:

 9.00 – 9.20 Registration

 

 9.20 – 9.30 Welcome and notices

 

 9.30 – 10.30 Steph Burgess

10.30 – 11.00 Break out discussion with questions

 

11.00 – 11.15 Tea/ Coffee break

 

11.15 – 12.15 Catherine Woolley STAMMA

12.15 – 12.45 Break out discussion with questions

 

12.45 – 13.30 Lunch (45 minutes)

 

13.30 – 14.30 Sara MacIntyre

14.30 – 15.00 Discussion and Q&A supporting the reflection and integration into clinical practice

 

15.00 – 15.15 Tea/ Coffee break

 

15.15 – 16.15 Hope Gerlach-Houck

16.15 – 16.45 Break out discussion with questions

 

16.45 – 17.00 Evaluation and close

 

Overview of the presentation

Steph Burgess - Working within the social model – reflections of an NHS stammering therapist

 

Catherine Woolley (STAMMA) - #nodiversitywithoutdysfluency – What are the negative assumptions people typically make about stammering and how can SLTs challenge these to support people that we work with? According to the social model of disability, negative cultural attitudes can lead to discrimination and exclusion as well as continued prejudice. Negative assumptions about stammering have been perpetuated by stereotypical and cliched portrayals across media such as television and film. By supporting people to have open conversations about stammering using accurate representations in modern media, SLTs can help to challenge negative assumptions and show people that it’s just the way that some people talk.

 

Sara MacIntyre - Unpacking Stuttering Acceptance: Understanding the Complexities from a Clinical and Personal Perspective

Acceptance is a layered, shifting, and evolving journey as it applies to stuttering and beyond. Individuals who stutter and clinicians alike can mistake the journey as having a finite destination, a place of absoluteness. However, this viewpoint can be limiting and misleading—leaving individuals to feel additional layers of shame and guilt, all while perpetuating the pervasive ‘I’m not good enough’ narrative. Similarly, clinicians can inadvertently oversimplify this process and ‘state of being’ leading to challenges and limitations within the therapeutic process and alliance. An additional complexity that can arise when discussing or exploring acceptance is this notion that acceptance and physical change, or communication change, cannot coexist—leaving clinicians feeling uncertain about what is ‘on the table’—potentially swinging the pendulum too far the other direction and not supporting any shifts towards more effective communication change.

In this talk, we will unpack acceptance as a concept, how it can be best applied to stuttering, and we will explore the nuances from both an individual and clinician perspective. We will explore different clinical experiences and overall philosophical frameworks that may contribute to helping to support a client’s journey towards greater stuttering acceptance, while also supporting their hopes for change within their overall communication including decreasing fears and avoidances. Interwoven throughout will be an emphasis on the importance of semantics, intentionality, and action-based change.

 

Hope Gerlach-Houck - Beyond the Medical Model: Why people hide stuttering and suggestions for supportive speech therapy with people who stutter covertly.

Historically, much of our understanding of covert stuttering has been born from conceptions of stuttering rooted in the medical model of disability. In this presentation, we will discuss how stigma and environmental factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of stuttering concealment. Participants will gain knowledge about why, how, and when people conceal stuttering. We will also explore affirming ways to support people who conceal stuttering through speech therapy focused on personal empowerment and environmental modification.

Continuing conversations about the Social Model of Disability

Date:               Thursday 23rd June 2022

Time:              09:30 - 17:00 (GMT)

Venue:            live-streamed via Zoom

Speaker:         Steph Burgess - Senior Specialist Speech and                            Language Therapist - Airedale NHS Trust

                        Catherine Woolley - Programme Lead for                                      Children and Families at STAMMA

                        Sara MacIntyre - CCC-SLP and Director of                                  Programs for the Stuttering Foundation

Cost:               Included in the 12mth CEN membership                                      subscription

Timetable of the day:

 9.00 – 9.20 Registration

 

 9.20 – 9.30 Welcome and notices

 

 9.30 – 10.30 Steph Burgess

10.30 – 11.00 Break out discussion with questions

 

11.00 – 11.15 Tea/ Coffee break

 

11.15 – 12.15 Catherine Woolley STAMMA

12.15 – 12.45 Break out discussion with questions

 

12.45 – 13.30 Lunch (45 minutes)

 

13.30 – 14.30 Sara MacIntyre

14.30 – 15.00 Discussion and Q&A supporting the reflection and integration into clinical practice

 

15.00 – 15.15 Tea/ Coffee break

 

15.15 – 16.15 Hope Gerlach-Houck

16.15 – 16.45 Break out discussion with questions

 

16.45 – 17.00 Evaluation and close

 

Overview of the presentation

Steph Burgess - Working within the social model – reflections of an NHS stammering therapist

 

Catherine Woolley (STAMMA) - #nodiversitywithoutdysfluency – What are the negative assumptions people typically make about stammering and how can SLTs challenge these to support people that we work with? According to the social model of disability, negative cultural attitudes can lead to discrimination and exclusion as well as continued prejudice. Negative assumptions about stammering have been perpetuated by stereotypical and cliched portrayals across media such as television and film. By supporting people to have open conversations about stammering using accurate representations in modern media, SLTs can help to challenge negative assumptions and show people that it’s just the way that some people talk.

 

Sara MacIntyre - Unpacking Stuttering Acceptance: Understanding the Complexities from a Clinical and Personal Perspective

Acceptance is a layered, shifting, and evolving journey as it applies to stuttering and beyond. Individuals who stutter and clinicians alike can mistake the journey as having a finite destination, a place of absoluteness. However, this viewpoint can be limiting and misleading—leaving individuals to feel additional layers of shame and guilt, all while perpetuating the pervasive ‘I’m not good enough’ narrative. Similarly, clinicians can inadvertently oversimplify this process and ‘state of being’ leading to challenges and limitations within the therapeutic process and alliance. An additional complexity that can arise when discussing or exploring acceptance is this notion that acceptance and physical change, or communication change, cannot coexist—leaving clinicians feeling uncertain about what is ‘on the table’—potentially swinging the pendulum too far the other direction and not supporting any shifts towards more effective communication change.

In this talk, we will unpack acceptance as a concept, how it can be best applied to stuttering, and we will explore the nuances from both an individual and clinician perspective. We will explore different clinical experiences and overall philosophical frameworks that may contribute to helping to support a client’s journey towards greater stuttering acceptance, while also supporting their hopes for change within their overall communication including decreasing fears and avoidances. Interwoven throughout will be an emphasis on the importance of semantics, intentionality, and action-based change.

 

Hope Gerlach-Houck - Beyond the Medical Model: Why people hide stuttering and suggestions for supportive speech therapy with people who stutter covertly.

Historically, much of our understanding of covert stuttering has been born from conceptions of stuttering rooted in the medical model of disability. In this presentation, we will discuss how stigma and environmental factors contribute to the onset and maintenance of stuttering concealment. Participants will gain knowledge about why, how, and when people conceal stuttering. We will also explore affirming ways to support people who conceal stuttering through speech therapy focused on personal empowerment and environmental modification.

If you are already a member of the CEN, you can click on the button below to register for a place on this study day.

If you are not a member of the CEN, you can click on the button below to become a member.

© 2021 Created by National Dysfluency CEN - Communications Officer - Julia Henly

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